BandGrip wound closure technology to be utilised after surgery to improve outcomes

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BandGrip technology

BandGrip has announced a partnership with Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, USA, to improve patient care and efficiencies in the operating room. According to a statement, Rush has recognised the benefits of the product and knows it would be well-received by patients and surgeons alike.

“Patient-centered care is of paramount importance to me, and BandGrip addresses many of the concerns my patients have,” says orthopaedic sports medicine surgeon Brian Cole, , associate chairman and professor, Department of Orthopaedics at Rush University; chairman, Department of Surgery at Rush Oak Park Hospital; and section head of the Cartilage Restoration Center, part of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.

Cole implemented the product into his open and minimally invasive surgical procedures in recent months and says BandGrip is changing the way patients experience surgery and its outcomes.

“First, BandGrip helps the surgical team close the incision faster, which means patients spend less time under anaesthesia and are less susceptible to the complications of surgery,” he says. “Second, it’s transparent, so patients and surgeons can watch the pinched skin underneath the bandage heal and check for any infections.”

“Third, there is no pain in removing BandGrip like there often is with sutures and staples.  In some cases, patients can even remove BandGrip themselves at home. And finally, the cosmetic results are better than I have seen compared to other closure methods. When patients see the minimal scarring, they are relieved they don’t have to hide their skin or feel embarrassed about their scar.”

“We are proud to provide this advanced wound closure technology to such a prestigious, leading academic medical centre,” says Fred Smith, founder and CEO of BandGrip. “The minimally invasive micro-anchors and intuitive design of our product has shown significant time savings in surgical suites.”

Surgeons across various surgical specialties, including orthopaedics, will use BandGrip to close surgical wounds as part of an agreement signed between the medical device company and the Rush University System for Health.

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